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Colorectal Cancer Alliance research grant, guidelines and application

Apply for a Research Grant

In 2018, we will award 3 grants in young-onset colorectal cancer research. Each will be a multi-year grant in the amount of $125,000. In addition, we will award one colorectal cancer prevention grant, which will be a multi-year grant in the amount of $150,000 as well as one multi-year rectal cancer grant in the amount of $250,000. Additional funding for rectal cancer research may become available pending further financial support. Continue to visit our research funding page for future updates. 

The current grant cycle is now closed.  Grant selections will be complete in December 2018 and awards will be announced in January 2019.

Program Summary


According to the American Cancer Society, Cancers of the colon and rectum have been declining in older adults in recent decades and have always been considered rare in young people. However, scientists are now reporting a sharp rise in colorectal cancers in adults as young as their 20s and 30s, an ominous trend. A recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute states that adults born circa 1950, compared with those born circa 1990, have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer. In addition, from 1989-90 to 2012-2013 the proportion of rectal cancers diagnosed in adults younger than age 55 doubled from 14.6% to 29.2%. Currently, nearly one-third of rectal patients are younger than age 55. Given these rising trends, the Colorectal Cancer Alliance Chris4Life Research Grants in Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Research represent an effort to encourage and support researchers to conduct young-onset colorectal cancer research and to establish a successful career path in this field.

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society It is expected to cause about 50,630 deaths during 2018. The death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping in both men and women for several decades. It is believed that the reason for this downward trend is due largely to an increase in prevention and early detection strategies. Given colorectal cancer’s preventative potential, the Colorectal Cancer Alliance Chris4Life Research Grants in Prevention Research represent an effort to encourage and support researchers to conduct colorectal cancer prevention research and to establish a successful career path in this field. It is the organization’s mission to end the disease in our lifetime. By supporting prevention research, the Colorectal Cancer Alliance will be one step closer to achieving its mission.

The American Cancer Society is estimating 43,030 new cases of rectal cancer in 2018. While rectal cancer incidence rates in adults 55 and over continue to decline, the opposite is the case for those younger than 55. According to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in February of 2017, the incidence of rectal cancer increased by 3.2% per year during the 40-year study period among patients aged 20-29 years and in those aged 30-39 years. It did not begin rising until the 1990s in adults aged 40-49 years and 50-54 years, and then, it rose by a smaller amount of 2.3% per year. In addition, according to a recent article published in the Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery Journal, outcomes for rectal cancer surgery have improved significantly over the past 20 years with increasing rates of survival and decreasing rates of recurrence, specific to local recurrence. These gains have been realized during a period of time in which there has been an increasing emphasis on sphincter preservation. As surgeons become increasingly aggressive in avoiding resection of the anus, they have begun accepting bowel dysfunction as a normal outcome. Low Anterior Resection Syndrome is defined as a constellation of symptoms including incontinence, frequency, urgency, or feelings of incomplete emptying. It has a significant impact on quality of life and results in many patients opting for a permanent colostomy to avoid these symptoms. Given these trends, The Colorectal Cancer Alliance Chris4Life Research Grant in Rectal Cancer Research represents an effort to encourage and support researchers to conduct rectal cancer research that will lead to improved outcomes and increased quality of life. The Colorectal Cancer Alliance strives to support researchers to conduct rectal cancer research that will enable them to establish a successful career path in this field.

Questions?

Contact Stephanie Guiffre at sguiffre@ccalliance.org.