Tandem golf tournaments raise more than $50,000 for young-onset colorectal cancer research

Family, friends, and colleagues of Jake Lyons―including his mother and son (lower right)―celebrated Jake’s life and raised $58,435 for young-onset colorectal cancer research during a duo of golfing events in September.

Family, friends, and colleagues of Jake Lyons―including his mother and son (lower right)―celebrated Jake’s life and raised $58,435 for young-onset colorectal cancer research during a duo of golfing events in September.

The Colorectal Cancer Alliance is thrilled to announce the receipt of $58,435 for young-onset colorectal cancer research. The family, friends, and colleagues of Jake Lyons, who died of colon cancer at 31 years old, raised the funds during two related events in September—the Jake Lyons Memorial ‘Cancer Sucks’ Golf Classic in Georgia and a related golf tournament near the corporate headquarters of Jake’s former employer, Olympus, in Pennsylvania.

The money will help fund a $125,000 grant, awarded over a two-year period, to support a mentored academic researcher working on young-onset colorectal cancer research. The Colorectal Cancer Alliance will announce the recipient of that grant in December.

Research into young-onset colorectal cancer is necessary because the risk of this cancer is on the rise in people under 50 years old. This trend is consistent across various types of studies and from different investigators. While the cause of this rise is unknown, it’s important to recognize the changing pattern of this disease in the young adult population and learn more about it.

This is the fourth year Olympus and the Jake Lyons Memorial ‘Cancer Sucks’ Golf Classic have supported the Alliance. The fundraisers have, in total, dedicated more than $200,000 toward young-onset colorectal cancer research.

Jake was a passionate ally, sharing his story, advocating for more colorectal cancer awareness—even speaking at Olympus to educate his colleagues—and organizing the first ‘Cancer Sucks’ Golf Classic.

Events like the ‘Cancer Sucks’ Golf Classic help spread awareness about the changing trends in colorectal cancer incidence and help prompt recognition of symptoms and earlier detection.

 

Related links:

A tribute to Jake Lyons

Top five things to know about young-onset colon cancer

Funding New Research in Under 50

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *