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Obamacare Repeal: What You Need to Know Now

The Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”) has been a divisive topic ever since its passage in 2010, with roughly half of Americans strongly supportive and the other half equally opposed.  Despite the passion that people on both sides feel,most Americans know little about the law itself and their views are often shaped by political affiliation or what they see on social media.

With the start of the 115th session of Congress with Republicans controlling both the House and Senate and the inauguration of President-Elect Donald Trump this month it is now certain that the Affordable Care Act will be repealed but beyond that there is little that is certain.  So what will happen now and what does it mean for people with colon cancer and their families? Read more

21st Century Cures Act: Better Late Than Never Holiday Gift to Patients

In 2014 the House Energy and Commerce Committee held eight hearings on developing legislation that would help accelerate the development of new treatments for cancer and other serious diseases.  In April the following year our blog called on Congress to stop talking and take action and we were thrilled in July of 2015 when the House passed the 21st Century Cures Act, likely the only piece of legislation that the House Republicans and President Obama both supported.  Unfortunately the Senate decided to bicker over the funding level for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the legislation appeared to die in a partisan stalemate. Read more

Cancer Patients Can’t Wait—Tell Your Senator To Act Now

Last July, the Colon Cancer Alliance applauded members of the House of Representatives for putting patient’s lives ahead of their political differences as the House overwhelming passed the 21st Century Cures Act by a 344 to 77 margin. This landmark legislation includes $9 billion in funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support cutting-edge biomedical research; it modernizes and streamlines the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval process for new treatments; and it removes the barriers that limited use of nationwide health data to help researchers and doctors improve health outcomes.

The House bill then went to the Senate. We assumed, given the fact this legislation literally has the potential to save lives, that the Senate would make it a top priority; instead last year the Senate essentially did nothing. Now this year Senator Alexander from Tennessee, Chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee (HELP) decided not to take up the House bill and instead consider a series of twenty different Senate bills that contain elements of the House version. 

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